Book Review: Gates of Thread and Stone

Genres: Young Adult; Fantasy; Romance

Rating: 4 stars

Summary:

In the Labyrinth, we had a saying: keep silent, keep still, keep safe.
In a city of walls and secrets, where only one man is supposed to possess magic, seventeen-year-old Kai struggles to keep hidden her own secret—she can manipulate the threads of time. When Kai was eight, she was found by Reev on the riverbank, and her “brother” has taken care of her ever since. Kai doesn’t know where her ability comes from—or where shecame from. All that matters is that she and Reev stay together, and maybe one day move out of the freight container they call home, away from the metal walls of the Labyrinth. Kai’s only friend is Avan, the shopkeeper’s son with the scandalous reputation that both frightens and intrigues her.
Then Reev disappears. When keeping silent and safe means losing him forever, Kai vows to do whatever it takes to find him. She will leave the only home she’s ever known and risk getting caught up in a revolution centuries in the making. But to save Reev, Kai must unravel the threads of her past and face shocking truths about her brother, her friendship with Avan, and her unique power.

Review:

The second I saw this book I knew I had to read it. I’m a sucker for pretty covers, and this one is no exception. Still, I found myself a bit wary to buy it- perhaps because of my experience with other books that are only beautiful on the outside. Even after I had it in my possession, it still me over five months to get to. Thankfully, this story is one that can afford to be judged by its cover, because it is just as good underneath.
The mythology in Gates of Thread and Stone is reminiscent of that of the Greeks and Romans. The “gods” are technically forbidden to interfere with the humans, but they do anyway. Still, the differences are plentiful, and they are so interesting that all I wanted to do was learn more. I absolutely loved the idea that there were only a certain amount of “gods”, and if one died or retired (yes, they can do that!) then they had to be replaced by one of their descendants.
The book is perfectly paced. Yes, it is a search-and-find book, so it was slow, but so much was happening throughout the story that it was not a bad thing at all. Lori M. Lee’s writing style worked wonderfully with the plot- her slow, descriptive scenes went hand in hand with the action packed ones.
The characters went through so much by the time they reached the final page. Each was a new person, completely changed by the course of the novel, and the development was flawless. Their growth was realistic and their setbacks understandable. They faced each turn in the road with determination, and I admired them for their perserverance.
Speaking of turns in the road… there were a lot. The best part was that I did not-could not- predict any of the major ones. I only knew what Kai knew at any given point. And some of the bigger ones… were surprising, to say the least.
The only problem I had with this book was the romance. It was sweet, sure, and didn’t really interfere with my overall opinion of the book, but it was definitely a little irritating. Almost everything that Kai thought was followed by something about Avan: “Without Avan in front of me, I felt unsteady. I leaned forward, resting my hands on the seat. It was warm. I drew away, flustered.” Her infatuation with him seemed like it was just for the sake of adding the book to the romance genre. While I had nothing against Avan, I was never given any reason to fall in love with him.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It was easy to read and kept me hooked from page one to page three hundred thirty three. I definitely recommend Gates of Thread and Stone to anyone who is looking for a good fantasy book.

Read if you liked: Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson//These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Megan Spooner

4 thoughts on “Book Review: Gates of Thread and Stone”

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